Deciding on a CD Term Length

If you’ve made up your mind that you’re going to invest some money this year, you might be considering a CD, or certificate of deposit. CDs are commonly viewed as a safer alternative to potentially higher-yielding investment vehicles such as stocks or mutual funds, because fixed-rate CDs have a set, guaranteed interest rate, and they’re protected by FDIC insurance. Bank5 Connect CD accounts are actually covered by both FDIC and DIF insurance. The DIF coverage at Bank5 Connect ensures that all deposits are 100% insured, even past traditional FDIC coverage limits.cd-term-length

Not surprisingly, the safety of CDs, coupled with the fact that they generally offer higher interest rates than traditional savings accounts, makes them popular choices for saving money. If you’ve chosen a CD as one of your investment tools, it’s just a matter of deciding how long you want to tie up your funds. With CDs, you have several fixed term lengths to choose from. They can range from as little as 3 months to up to 10 years. The term you select will depend on your unique financial circumstances and needs.

When considering CDs, it’s important to note that they’re intended to be held until maturity. When they mature, you have the option to withdraw the money, along with any accrued interest, but if you withdraw any money before the entire term length is up, you’ll usually be hit with an early withdrawal penalty fee. The policies regarding early withdrawals vary, so it’s always wise to check with your financial institution prior to opening an account to see what kinds of penalties you could incur.

To avoid early withdrawal penalties, it’s a good idea to choose a CD term based on how long you think you can go without needing access to the money. If you anticipate needing to tap into the funds within a few months, then a 3- or 6-month CD will probably be the way to go. Keep in mind however, that typically the shorter the term length, the lower the interest rate.

Generally, multiple year terms offer the highest CD rates. If you know you won’t need to tap into the funds for several years, a multi-year term could be a good fit, but it’s a good idea to consider current interest rate trends and predictions first. Think about it. How angry would you be if you locked in a 2.00% rate on a 5-year CD only to find that the rate on that exact CD increased to 2.50% a few weeks later? Once you’ve opened a fixed-rate CD, your rate won’t change, even if the bank starts to offer the same CD at a higher rate. To help avoid this kind of scenario, it’s a good idea to stay on top of interest rate news, so you have some kind of idea of when rates could fluctuateAs a courtesy, you will be leaving Blog.Bank5Connect.com and going to another website. We have approved this site as a reliable partner, but you will no longer be under the security policy of Bank5Connect.com. Come back soon!.

Another consideration with CDs is how often you’ll be looking to stash away more money. Generally, once you open a CD you can’t add money to it until it matures. Therefore, if you think you’ll want to add money every few months, a shorter term length might be best. Another option is to choose an add-on CD. Add-on CDs are special fixed-term CDs that allow you to deposit additional funds throughout the entire term length. These types of CDs can be hard to find, but Bank5 Connect does offer one. Bank5 Connect’s 24-Month Investment CD allows for additional deposits at any time, in any amount. Plus, there is only a $500 minimum deposit required to open an account, and no monthly maintenance fees.

If you have enough money to open several CDs, another way to allow for ongoing deposits is to invest in multiple CDs with various term lengths. This approach is known as CD laddering. With CD laddering, you end up with a collection of CDs that will mature at regular intervals. With a CD regularly reaching maturity, you’ll regularly have an opportunity to make additional deposits, or withdraw your funds.

No matter what CD term length best suits your needs, just remember to read all of the fine print associated with the account before opening one. This will help you to understand exactly what you’re getting into, and help you to avoid costly early withdrawal penalty fees. And, keep in mind that it’s always a good idea to consult with a tax advisor or financial professional before making any major investment decisions!

Reaching Multiple Financial Goals

With the start of a new year, now’s a good time to assess your financial goals. And if you don’t have any financial goals hammered out, now’s a good time to create some!

Your financial objectives will likely vary depending on what stage you’re at in life and what you hope to accomplish. They could range from buying a new car to saving for a luxury vacation.
Expenses and orther tags on savings money jar
No matter what your goals are, the first step in reaching them is to establish a budget. Having a structured financial plan that constantly tracks your income and expenses makes it easier to attain your objectives.

One of the most beneficial things about creating a budget is that it forces you to examine your “needs” and your “wants”. Your “needs” are those expenses that are critical and non-negotiable. Examples would be your rent or mortgage payment, car insurance, utility bills, child support payments, and medical bills. Your “wants” on the other hand are things that you could live without, such as cable, daily lattes, spa treatments, and restaurant meals.

Once you determine how much money you should stash away each month toward your various financial goals, you may find that you’ll need to tweak your monthly “wants” in order to do so. This could mean canceling your cable subscription in order to free up more of your budget, or it could mean cutting back on the number of times you eat out every month.

It’s also important to determine where you’re going to stash your savings. Many people find it’s easier to stay on track with each individual goal if they have a dedicated savings account for each one. But keep in mind that a traditional savings account may not necessarily be the right fit for each of your goals.

For example, if you’re saving toward a long-term goal, it might make sense to open a Money Market account, which typically has a higher interest rate than a traditional savings account. There are also some Certificate of Deposit (CD) accounts, like Bank5 Connect’s Investment CD, that allow you to make deposits whenever you’d like. But since most CDs do have penalties for withdrawing money before the CD matures, it’s important to choose a term length that coincides with your savings goals.

There are also some specific types of accounts that are useful for particular goals. For example, two of the most popular savings vehicles for retirement goals are 401K accounts and Individual Retirement Accounts (commonly referred to as IRAs). Likewise, 529 Savings Plans and Coverdell Education Savings Accounts are popular choices when saving for college expenses.

There are also savings accounts out there with very competitive interest rates. These are typically called “high-yield” or “high-interest” savings accounts. Just be sure to read all of the fine print associated with the account before opening one, as many higher-interest accounts come with conditions such as minimum balance requirements or monthly maintenance fees. If you’re looking for a high-yield account without a lot of red tape, a Bank5 Connect High-Interest Savings Account could be good choice. This account only requires a minimum balance of $100 to earn interest, and has no monthly maintenance fee.

When choosing which account is right for your savings goals, just keep in mind that it’s always a good idea to consult a financial professional or tax advisor before making any major financial decisions.

No matter what your financial goals may be, establishing a solid game plan is the first step in achieving them. By putting together a budget and choosing the right type of account for your saving needs, you’ll be well on your way to accomplishing your multiple goals.

Establish an Emergency Fund for Life’s Unplanned Expenses

What happens if your car breaks down in the middle of the road? Or the boss tells you that the company is downsizing and you’ll be losing your job? What if your heating system decides to die in the middle of winter? Or you need to be hospitalized immediately? If any of these emergencies were to happen today, are you financially prepared for them? emergency-fund-for-lifes-unplanned-expenses

If your answer is “no,” then it’s a good time to think about setting up an emergency fund. Having enough money to cover unplanned expenses makes it easier to recover from life’s bumps and bruises, and can help alleviate stress in emergency situations and provide peace of mind.

But you may be wondering – doesn’t a credit card serve as a good backup for funds in case of emergencies? Of course it does, but you need to keep a few things in mind. For starters, credit cards provide borrowed money, which means you have to pay it back. And if you don’t pay it all back at once when your monthly statement comes due, you’ll be hit with interest. Interest charges can snowball pretty quickly, and for a lot of people they can lead to massive credit card debt.

Financial experts will tell you that an emergency fund should be part of every household budget. It should be as high of a priority as putting money aside for a down payment on a new house or car, or financing your child’s college education.

But how do you know what’s an adequate amount to have in an emergency fund? A good goal for your emergency savings account could be anywhere from three months’ worth of your salary to a year’s worth of your salary, depending on how much you make each year, and how prepared you’d like to be. When deciding the right amount of savings to aim for, think of what it would be like to unexpectedly lose your job. How much would be enough to pay for routine monthly household bills such as rent/mortgage payments, utility bills, and groceries? And how many months do you think it would take you to find a new job?

It may seem overwhelming to think about amassing that much money, but it’s okay to start small. By earmarking a certain amount of money to stash away in your emergency fund each month, you’ll be on your way to achieving your goal emergency balance. And one of the best ways to ensure you stick to your savings plan, is set up your paycheck to direct deposit a certain amount from each paycheck directly into your emergency savings account. If you don’t see the money, you likely won’t miss it! If your job offers direct deposit, your employer can likely help you set it up so your paycheck is split between your desired accounts.

Another way to reach your savings goals as quickly as possible is to stash your money in a high-interest savings account. Many online-only banks offer higher interest rates than traditional brick-and-mortar banks, because they have fewer overhead costs. Online banks save on costs associated with running physical locations, and they pass those cost-savings along to customers in the form of higher interest rates. The higher the interest rate, the more your money grows.

The key is to stick to your emergency savings plan, and make sure that you contribute to it on a regular basis until you reach your balance goal. You’ll be happy you did when an emergency arises and you have the money to pay for it without racking up debt.

Don’t Be Drained By Holiday Financial Strain

The holidays are a joyful time of year, but unfortunately they can be very stressful for some people. The pressures of gift giving and keeping up with traditions can cause a lot of financial worry, but the good news is that there are steps you can take to minimize money woes this holiday.

Piggy bank with christmas hat isolated on white background

For starters, you should get a sense of how much money you can spend. This should be a realistic number based on your finances, not one that you pull out of thin air. And remember that just because you have a certain amount of money doesn’t mean you have to spend all of it. Sometimes, less is more. And don’t even think about spending money that you don’t have. Even though credit cards make it extremely easy to spend beyond your means, you’ll pay for it later if you do. No one wants to be facing a mountain of debt once the New Year rolls around.

Once you’ve determined how much money is in your holiday fund, you should identify all of your holiday-related expenses. You should include everything you plan to spend money on during the season – gifts, decorations, Christmas cards, you name it! Once you have your expenses accounted for, you can decide how much of your holiday money you’d like to spend on each.

So what happens if it looks like your holiday money will be stretched too thin? What if you won’t have enough to cover all of your holiday expenses? The answer is… get creative! You’d be surprised how a little resourceful thinking can help you save big. Here’s a list of some ideas to help you cut down your holiday costs this season:

In the end, it’s important to remember that the holiday season isn’t about money. Reflecting on what the holiday means to you can help you overcome the financial pressures that accompany it, and find more meaningful ways to experience it. Spending time with family and friends, listening to holiday music, going to a church service – these are all ways that you can enjoy the season without racking up debt and stress. Happy Holidays!

Making the Switch to a Mobile Wallet

There you are, impressed with yourself for getting the rest of your holiday shopping done in just a couple of hours. You make your way to the checkout aisle and hand over your items.AdobeStock_112895088

While the salesperson is ringing everything up, you dig into your purse or pocket for your wallet…but wait, where is it? Now you’re frantically rummaging while customers wait impatiently behind you. It’s then that you realize you pulled it out at the drive-thru to pay for a coffee and left it behind in your car. So much for being done with your holiday shopping.

In the event of a missing wallet, wouldn’t it be great if you could whip out your smartphone, or flash your smartwatch and somehow use it to pay for your goods? Well guess what – you can! Meet the “mobile wallet”.

A mobile wallet is a virtual wallet that stores credit and debit card information on a mobile device. And, it encrypts that information so it can’t be easily accessed if your device falls into the wrong hands.

The most widely used mobile wallets right now are Apple Pay, Android Pay, and Samsung Pay. Some mobile devices come pre-loaded with a mobile wallet, and if your device doesn’t have one you can download a mobile wallet from your phone’s app store. First though, you’ll need to see whether your debit and credit cards are compatible with the mobile wallet. Bank5 Connect debit cards support Apple Pay, and a full list of Apple Pay-friendly banks can be found at https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204916As a courtesy, you will be leaving Blog.Bank5Connect.com and going to another website. We have approved this site as a reliable partner, but you will no longer be under the security policy of Bank5Connect.com. Come back soon!. If you’re looking to see which banks support Samsung Pay, visit https://www.samsung.com/us/samsung-pay/compatible-cards/As a courtesy, you will be leaving Blog.Bank5Connect.com and going to another website. We have approved this site as a reliable partner, but you will no longer be under the security policy of Bank5Connect.com. Come back soon!. A list of Android Pay participating banks can be found at https://www.android.com/pay/participating-banks/As a courtesy, you will be leaving Blog.Bank5Connect.com and going to another website. We have approved this site as a reliable partner, but you will no longer be under the security policy of Bank5Connect.com. Come back soon!.

Retailers around the world are plugging into the mobile wallet culture. Millions of business now accept mobile wallet payments at their brick-and-mortar locations, and many of those retailers allow you to use your mobile wallet for online purchases as well.

Just don’t confuse the term “mobile wallet” with “digital wallet”. While they are both very similar, they do have some key differences. Think of a mobile wallet as a credit or debit card that lives on your mobile device. If you’re purchasing something in a store, you physically take out your phone and hold it near the terminal at the checkout counter. If you’re shopping online, you can activate your mobile wallet on participating websites and use it to make your purchase.

A digital wallet on the other hand, is typically only used for online shopping. Examples of digital wallets include PayPal and Visa Checkout. When you sign up for a digital wallet service, you link your account to a debit or credit card. Like a mobile wallet, your card information is encrypted for security purposes. A digital wallet can also house your shipping information, so you can make online purchases quickly and easily, without having to enter all of your personal details on the website.

If getting through the checkout aisle a little faster sounds good to you, consider a mobile wallet. Just don’t forget to keep your device charged. A dead battery at the checkout counter is no more helpful than leaving your wallet in the car!

How to Talk About Finances with Your Spouse

In a marriage, being on the same page with your spouse regarding your finances is extremely important. Not talking about money can lead to fights, overdrawn bank accounts, underfunded retirement savings, home foreclosure, bankruptcy, and even divorce. But many couples steer clear of financial conversations because they’re afraid of sparking disagreements and arguments. In fact, marital experts say finances are one of the top sources of anxiety in married relationships.how-to-talk-about-finances-with-your-spouse

So what’s a married couple to do? Sit down and talk, that’s what. Here are some tips to help you and your spouse get on the same page about your finances.

First and foremost, schedule a time to meet. Talking about money is serious, and you should treat it that way. Try to have your discussion in a place that’s free of distractions, whether that means heading to a local coffee shop, or waiting until the kids are in bed.

If you and your spouse don’t each have a good sense of where your finances stand, that’s where you should start. Go through your all of your bank accounts, investment accounts and retirement accounts, noting the balances of each. Then, discuss all of your debt such as credit card balances, the money you owe on your mortgage and any vehicles you have, plus any other payment obligations you’re facing such as student loans, alimony, or child support.

If while digging through the numbers you find that your current financial situation isn’t as rosy as you’d like, it’s important to stay calm. Don’t point fingers at one another and start playing the blame game. Doing so will only derail the conversation and make you both weary of future financial discussions. Look over the numbers together, but don’t judge.

Once you’re both on the same page regarding where your finances stand, you should start talking about your financial goals. Listening is key here. Each spouse should have a chance to voice their own goals – without interruption or judgement – and then you can hash out which goals are the highest priority to you both. Once you’ve each laid out your personal goals, you should evaluate together which ones could have the biggest positive impact on your lives, and consider which ones will be easy or difficult to achieve. Rank the goals based on these factors, and pick one that you’re both comfortable with – whether it be paying off your credit cards, saving for a family vacation, starting a college fund for your kids, or buying a second home.

After you’ve agreed on a goal, it’s time to create a budget that will allow you to work toward it. Together, you should determine exactly how much money is coming into the household each month, and how much money is going out. In other words, how much income are you bringing in, and how many bills are you paying every month, and how much money are you putting into savings? Make tweaks to your budget that align with the goals you’ve laid out. For example, if you’re trying to pay off your credit card debt, you need to determine where that money will come from. It may mean canceling cable and going with a lower-priced video streaming service, or it might mean shopping around for less-expensive car insurance.

Once your goals have been established and you’ve mapped out a budget for achieving them, it’s important to remember that that the conversation is far from over. Keep each other informed about any expenses that fall outside of the budget – ideally before they happen. For example, if your child is going to need braces, or you’re thinking about buying a membership to a golf club, sit down and talk with your spouse first about how it will impact your finances and goals. No one likes to be blindsided with a major purchase they had no say in. Without ongoing communication about financial affairs, confusion and mistrust can surface and wreak havoc on your marriage.

Earn Interest with a Checking Account

It pays to have a checking account with an online bank – literally.

While many traditional checking accounts at brick-and-mortar banks do not earn any interest, online banks are a different story. Because online-only banks don’t have physical branches, they have less overhead costs than their brick-and-mortar counterparts. This allows them to offer high-yield, interest-bearing checking accounts.
Man writing a check

Many interest checking accounts require you to maintain a minimum balance in order to earn interest, and some accounts have certain requirements that must be met – such as a minimum number of debit card transactions – in order for customers to qualify for the stated interest rate. It’s important to note that some banks also cap the balance you can earn interest on. At Bank5 Connect, we try to keep it simple by offering a high-interest checking account with a minimum balance of just $100 to earn interest. There are no balance caps, and no additional hoops to jump through. There are also no monthly maintenance fees associated with the account. Learn more about our High-Interest Checking account here: http://www.bank5connect.com/home/high-interest-checking.

It’s important to keep in mind that oftentimes, interest-bearing checking accounts require you to conduct all of your banking activities online. This will probably be expected if you’re opening an interest checking account at an online bank that doesn’t have any physical branches, but it may come as a surprise if you’re opening an interest checking account at a local bank down the street. Some brick-and-mortar banks do in fact offer interest checking accounts, but it’s not uncommon for them to charge those customers a fee for in-branch transactions. They typically do this as a trade-off to help the bank offset the interest the customer is earning.

So, before opening an interest-bearing checking account, be sure to read all of the fine print to understand how, where, and when you will have access to your money. With a Bank5 Connect High Interest Checking account, our customers have free access to thousands of ATMs nationwide through the SUM NetworkAs a courtesy, you will be leaving Blog.Bank5Connect.com and going to another website. We have approved this site as a reliable partner, but you will no longer be under the security policy of Bank5Connect.com. Come back soon!. And, if they use an ATM outside of that network we still won’t charge them, and we will reimburse them for other banks’ surcharges up to $15 per statement cycle.

There are many high-yield, interest checking accounts out there to choose from, so be sure to review all of your options to find the account that’s right for you. Customer reviewsAs a courtesy, you will be leaving Blog.Bank5Connect.com and going to another website. We have approved this site as a reliable partner, but you will no longer be under the security policy of Bank5Connect.com. Come back soon!, and websites like GoBankingRatesAs a courtesy, you will be leaving Blog.Bank5Connect.com and going to another website. We have approved this site as a reliable partner, but you will no longer be under the security policy of Bank5Connect.com. Come back soon!, NerdwalletAs a courtesy, you will be leaving Blog.Bank5Connect.com and going to another website. We have approved this site as a reliable partner, but you will no longer be under the security policy of Bank5Connect.com. Come back soon! and The Simple DollarAs a courtesy, you will be leaving Blog.Bank5Connect.com and going to another website. We have approved this site as a reliable partner, but you will no longer be under the security policy of Bank5Connect.com. Come back soon! can help you compare what’s out there.